Our Current 2016-2017 Season:

Our Current 2016-2017 Season:

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Bob Cox Sings Becky's Praises in his First Non-Musical Role

Bob Cox as Chris with his stage mom (Erin Osgood as Becky)
Do you have to be middle-aged to have a mid-life crisis?  In Becky’s New Car – playing at the Farmington Players Barn Theater through February 25 – all of the characters are approaching a crossroads in their lives.  And even the youngest among them undergoes a transformation.  

In the Farmington Players’ production, Bob Cox plays Chris, Becky’s 24 year-old son that she sees as a freeloader who needs to get his act together and move out.  Yet Chris is a psychology student who is adept at turning the tables on his mother.  Bob describes his character as follows:  “Chris often uses his book-smarts to talk his way out of conversations that he doesn't want to have. He even uses some vocabulary terms from psychology class to describe what Becky does.  Chris is a little bit of a know-it-all, and can even come off as a snob, but he actually has a great sense of humor. Most importantly, despite being secretive and somewhat insensitive towards his parents, he really loves them a lot.”   Bob has a lot of self-awareness about Chris, saying, “He's at an awkward age where he thinks he's smart because he's so much smarter than he was five years ago, but doesn't yet realize that he'll eventually be looking back at his current self and shaking his head at how stupid he was.”  If only we could all see ourselves with the benefit of hindsight!

At age 28, Bob has 10 years of musical credits under his belt, but this is his first non-musical role.  He planned only to be assistant director for the show, but when no young men showed up at auditions, he filled in as Chris.  Director Cynthia Tupper was so impressed with his impromptu readings that she persuaded Bob to take the role.  Despite not knowing what to expect, Bob has truly enjoyed the experience, saying, “I'm sincerely happy things worked out this way because I didn't realize how much fun a non-musical actually is.  I'm surrounded by extraordinary actors and directors. The experience of Becky's New Car from the beginning has been a collaborative effort. The cast and crew have provided so much laughter and so many smiles through the course of our time together that I highly anticipate being out of sorts for a while when it's all said and done. Luckily, I know I'll see many if not most of them at the Barn again.”  

Becky’s New Car has three performances remaining at Farmington Players Barn Theater on February 23, 24 and 25.  The show is proudly sponsored by Cadillac Travel.  Tickets are available online at farmingtonplayers.org or by emailing boxoffice@farmingtonplayers.org or calling the Barn box office at 248-553-2955.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Sue Rogers Spices Things Up As Ginger in Becky’s New Car

Sue Rogers (back seat) revels in the role of Ginger, a wealthy socialite that dishes witty barbs in Becky's New Car
Shifting gears.  Changing lanes.  Taking the high road.  Choosing the path not taken.  Automotive analogies abound in Becky’s New Car – playing at the Farmington Players Barn Theater through February 25 – as protagonist Becky Foster sells cars for a living, but has to navigate a mid-life crisis that takes her in an unexpected direction.

Sue Rogers is a key member in Becky’s seven-person ensemble cast.  Sue plays Ginger, who she describes as a “wealthy socialite who gets her come-uppance—and actually enjoys careening into ‘downward mobility.’”  Since Sue describes herself as a “social worker and unabashed bleeding heart liberal,” her portrayal of the class-conscious Ginger is ironic: “What could be more fun than dressing up and rubbing elbows with the wealthy elite, while throwing out witty barbs and social criticism?”  Sue describes the show as “a modern-day comedy of manners.  We enjoy these characters because, just like our real friends, they have their goofy—and their wicked—sides. And like all good theater, this is a play with plenty of laugh-out-loud moments, but it also makes us think. What do we need to let go of? What do we hold most dear?”

One thing that Sue holds dear is the opportunity to reunite with long-time pal Cynthia Tupper, who is directing Sue for the seventh time – most recently in Rumors (2014) and Noises Off! (2004).  As Sue says, “Cynthia knows funny—and audiences will have a blast going along for the ride in Becky’s New Car.”  For her part, Cynthia says, “All of the characters are somehow stuck in their lives and desiring a big change.  How they go about getting themselves unstuck is an interesting process that not only makes you laugh but think.”  In addition to Cynthia, Sue is also happy to reconnect with Erin Osgood and Bob Hotchkiss, and to work with other Barn members she’s previously admired on stage. Sue loves the structure of the play – especially the audience interaction – about which she says, “You never know what can happen in live theater and this brings an added element of surprise each night. The audience really becomes a part in the play, rooting for the characters, not just from afar, but in the living room, in the office, and cruising along in the car.”


Becky’s New Car opened at the Farmington Players Barn Theater on February 10 with nine performances through February 25.  The show is proudly sponsored by Cadillac Travel.  Tickets are available online at farmingtonplayers.org or by emailing boxoffice@farmingtonplayers.org or calling the Barn box office at 248-553-2955.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Erin Osgood Drives Down the Road Less Traveled in Becky’s New Car


Chris (Bob Cox) has some advice for his mother Becky (Erin Osgood)
PHOTO by Jan Cartwright
Everybody loves that new car smell!  Especially in Detroit – the Motor City – a new car is celebrated almost as much as the arrival of a baby.  A new car is sort of a rebirth, a fresh start, a new lease on life.  In Becky’s New Car – which opens at the Farmington Players Barn Theater on February 10 – Becky Foster sells cars for a living.  But when an eccentric millionaire offers her more than just another sales opportunity, Becky decides that it might be more exciting to journey down the road less traveled.

Erin Osgood plays Becky, and audiences might not be sure whether they love her or hate her.  As Erin says, “I love the character of Becky because she is so relatable.  She makes big mistakes as she tries to climb out of the emotional hole she is in.  I love playing characters that are flawed or that audiences may hate because there are so many ways to interpret them.  Sure, Becky has made big mistakes, but she’s just trying to find true happiness again.”

While Becky’s happiness starts at home, her 25-year marriage to Joe (Bob Hotchkiss) and her adult son Chris (Bob Cox) no longer fulfill her.  Erin says, “She loves her family, but she has come to a point in her life where she feels empty.  Something is missing.  Her son is in grad school and makes her feel like he doesn’t need her anymore.  He is very intelligent and uses that throughout the play to make her feel defeated.  I think all mothers can relate to Becky.  She raised her wonderful boy to be more intelligent and more successful than she is, but now feels like she is being left behind and unimportant.  Becky just wants to still be a part of his life but she is only allowed the little morsels of information he chooses to give her.”   Similarly, Becky’s husband Joe is a very good man, but Becky “feels her marriage is on autopilot and is just going through the usual motions of her mundane life.  She misses the spontaneity and excitement.  She wants to feel beautiful and important again.  And as she says in the play, she wants ‘to be seen’ again.”

Erin finds the emotional and physical demands of the show challenging, saying, “I could definitely NOT be able to do it without the rest of the cast.  They really drive the show.  Without them entering when they do, Becky would just be on stage twiddling her thumbs.  Each of the other cast members are wonderful - Dorne, Bob, Sue, Bob Jr., Nancy, Steve!  They bring humor to rehearsals and lots of energy. I am so happy to be treading the boards with them.  And Cynthia Tupper has always been one of my favorite directors.  I trust her judgment completely and she allows actors to experiment.”


Becky’s New Car opens at the Farmington Players Barn Theater on February 10 with nine performances through February 25.  The show is proudly sponsored by Cadillac Travel.  Tickets are available online at farmingtonplayers.org or by emailing boxoffice@farmingtonplayers.org or calling the Barn box office at 248-553-2955.

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